On our trip to Italy, me and Tom began our tradition of visiting the Jewish area of any foreign city we visit.  This first time this happened, it was really because we wanted to escape the craziness of Sunday anywhere near the Vatican and weren’t sure that anything would be open.  As I remember it, not much was open anyway, but we took the opportunity to visit the Jewish Quarter in Rome.  Rome has one of the oldest Jewish traditions in Europe and has one of the most spectacular temples.  It’s actually the most ornate synagogue I’ve been in to this day: gold and vaulted ceilings, I think even some stained glass and a beautiful chuppah.  Interestingly, they had a second smaller sanctuary in the temple that was actually Sephardic (to those who don’t know, most temples and Jews you meet, especially in the US, are Ashkenazi, which more or less means those with Yiddish-speaking Eastern European Jewish ancestry).  On the way to the Jewish Quarter, we passed the obligatory ruins:

Then we went to the Jewish Quarter.  And had a meal.  No, we had a feast, and the piece de resistance was the fried artichokes.  Who would eat such a thing, you might ask.  Oh man, those artichokes were to die for.  Next time I’m in Rome, that’ll be one of the first places I go.  I can’t remember the name of the place, and the only pictures I have are of us happily fed with fried artichokey goodness, but I can’t recommend anything in Rome more.  Maybe our gnocchi place, but good luck finding that I’m not even sure where it is.

Wow, looking at that picture, I can’t believe how young I look!  I was a baby back then!  Wow, what 5 years will do to a person…

Anyway, that’s it for the Jewish Quarter in Rome.  I’ve been to some great historically Jewish areas of other European cities, but Rome kinda has them beat.  Until tomorrow…

Advertisements